4 Reasons Women Have Waited So Long for the Quick Help of Female Viagra

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Not only men experience bedroom problems. Women are facing huge challenges in the bedroom, as well. While men are lucky to have a long list of blue pills to choose from, women have to rely on trial and error remedies to save their sinking libido.

The good news is one little pink pill is coming to their rescue. A pharmaceutical company named Sprout Pharmaceuticals is going to release the female Viagra to the market now that they have the thumbs up from the U.S.Food and Drug Administration (FDA).

The female Viagra with the medical name Flibanserin, will be marketed as Addyi, is a non-hormonal drug reconstructed to address Hypoactive Sexual Desire Disorder (HSSD) in women.

It is a sexual disorder characterized by the persistent or recurring loss of interest in sexual activity and the absence of sexual fantasy.

Its libido-boosting effect was discovered by accident because the drug was originally intended to treat psychological conditions. The women participants had no significant improvement in their psychological problem upon taking the drug, but many of them observed improvements in their sexual functions.

Flibanserin failed twice to get an FDA approval for several reasons but with a new manufacturer, the third time was a success, and the long wait will soon be over when they release it to the public for sale in October 2015.

Still, it’s important to look into what caused the delay of Flibanserin to reaching drugstore shelves. Here are four reasons why women waited so long for the quick help of female Viagra:

1. Its Side-effects May Outweighs Its Benefits

Flibanserin, or the female Viagra was originally produced to work as an antidepressant and was later on developed into a female sexual enhancer after the researchers noticed improvements in sexual function as the participants reported.

low blood pressureAt the first request for an FDA approval, flibanserin got a unanimous “no” from health experts because its effectiveness didn’t compensate for the danger of the side effects after some tests.

The flibanserin users from the test groups suffered side effects such as nausealow blood pressure, and fainting while they showed little changes in their sex drive. Passing out in the middle of somewhere is not worth the slightest change in sex drive. That’s just too dangerous.

Unlike Viagra and other “blue pills” that works on increasing blood flow for better stimulation and erection, flibanserin works as a libido enhancer by triggering chemical changes in the brain, which could be a little more difficult and vague.

Add to it the lack of tests when women take it with alcohol and other substances that can interact with the drug. After this, the pharmaceutical company that first developed flibanserin sold it to Sprout Pharmaceuticals.

The FDA is mandating doctors, as well as the company to issue warnings to women who take Addyi not to drink alcohol while taking it to avoid waking up groggy or fainting. The FDA reported that women should also avoid taking Addyi with some other drugs, including those medications women use to treat yeast infections.

As part of the approval, Sprout has also agreed to conduct additional safety studies. The company is hoping that insurance companies will cover the cost of the new drug at the same level they cover men’s ED drugs, such as Viagra.

2. Could it Be Biased?

blue pillIn the hands of a new owner, the campaigns for an FDA approval were taken to another level.

They said the FDA was guilty of gender bias, even way before Viagra was approved in 1998, followed by a long list of male libido enhancers, while they won’t approve a single female version of the blue pill. In line with this, they launched a campaign called Even the Score.

Critics of Sprout accused the company of funding such campaigns to put pressure on FDA. Critics say Sprout is unmindful of the possible effects of Addyi, and all they wanted is to make money. Obviously, libido enhancers create an excellent cash cow after Viagra of Pfizer made a $1.9 billion sale in 2008 alone.

Health experts agree that women, too, should have easy access to libido enhancers, but Flibanserin is not just the drug fit for the purpose. According to Dr. Adriane Fugh-Berman of Georgetown University, “To approve this drug would set the worst kind of precedent. The companies that spend enough money can force the FDA to approve useless and dangerous drugs.”

3. Flibanserin is No Female Viagra

Flibanserin is popularly coined as the female Viagra. Although, the two have the same purpose, they work in two extremely opposite ways. Viagra offers a simple solution to a simple problem. To enhance blood flow to the penis, so men can get better erections, not improve a man’s libido.

sexual dysfunction in womenFlibanserin, on the other hand, does not work directly on the genitals. The drug claims to alter the brain’s function, but experts aren’t sure how it specifically works. They don’t know exactly how Flibanserin can cure sexual dysfunction in women.

Experts are skeptical since no other drugs has had the same effects as Flibanserin. Additionally, Viagra will take effect a few minutes after popping the pill while Addyi takes four to eight weeks, as women observed in the trials.

One medical expert said that a Viagra counterpart should directly address problems that involve the clitoris, which Flibanserin does not. The expert added that the female sex drive is a complex matter that needs more understanding.

4. It Lacked Tests on Women With Health Conditions

During the two requests for an FDA approval, experts agreed that Flibanserin lacked tests to determine its effect on women with existing health conditions, or when under the influence of alcohol.

One of the side effects of the drug is lowered blood pressure,which can be dangerous for women with cardiac problems. Next, most of the tests done by the manufacturer had healthy women participants who weren’t taking medications, sleeping pills and contraceptives. There is a huge possibility that the drug can interact with other drugs.

alcoholLastly, it’s not clear how Flibanserin can interact with alcohol. In one of the company’s test, the result showed that taking Flibanserin with alcohol can worsen the side effects.

But, what’s appalling is that the study had 23 male participants out of the 25. How on earth is it logical to test a drug for women in men? How will they know its effect on women if they aren’t testing it on women?

Let’s hope the additional research studies that Sprout plans to do will answer some of these questions.

Now that Addyihas the FDA stamp of approval as atreatment for HSSD in women, it will be interesting to see who things pan out. The reported common side effects are dizziness, nausea, and drowsiness. Contraindications to the use of Addyi include alcohol intake, people with liver problems and those who are taking moderate-to-strong CYP3A4 inhibitors.

Women and their partners have long been waiting to get their hands on a drug that will help ladies battle low libido. Finally, a pharmaceutical company created a drug that might be a potential treatment, approved by the FDA. The additional studies will prove helpful, as well the feedback from the many women who will be waiting in line to try it come October.

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